Health Library Explorer
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A-Z Listings Contact Us
Pediatric Health Library
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Topic IndexLibrary Index
Click a letter to see a list of conditions beginning with that letter.
Click 'Topic Index' to return to the index for the current topic.
Click 'Library Index' to return to the listing of all topics.

Genes, Family Are Key Predictors of School Success

FRIDAY, Dec. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It may be possible to predict a child's chances of academic success at birth, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that kids' genes and their parents' education and wealth were big predictors of school success.

They analyzed data from 5,000 children born in the U.K. between 1994 and 1996, including test results at key stages of their education and their parents' wealth and levels of education.

The results suggest that while genes have a significant effect on academic success, having wealthy, highly educated parents is even more important.

While 47% of kids with a high genetic propensity for education but poorer parents made it to university, the rate was 62% among those with a low genetic propensity but wealthier parents.

Kids with both a high genetic propensity and wealthy, well-educated parents had the greatest advantage -- with 77% going to university. The rate was 21% among children who had both low genetic propensity and poorer families.

The findings, published recently in the journal Developmental Science, could help identify kids who are at greatest risk of poor educational outcomes, according to the study authors.

"Genetics and socioeconomic status capture the effects of both nature and nurture, and their influence is particularly dramatic for children at the extreme ends of distribution," said lead author Sophie von Stumm, professor of psychology in education at the University of York in the U.K.

"However, our study also highlights the potentially protective effect of a privileged background. Having a genetic makeup that makes you more inclined to education does make a child from a disadvantaged background more likely to go to university, but not as likely as a child with a lower genetic propensity from a more advantaged background," she added in a university news release.

von Stumm noted that the findings are observational and suggest that kids don't have equal opportunity in education because of their different genetics and family backgrounds.

"Where you come from has a huge impact on how well you do in school," she said in the release.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on school.

SOURCE: University of York, news release, Dec. 18, 2019

Copyright ©2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Powered by StayWell